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Washington State University Puyallup Research and Extension Center

WSU debuts flavorful, easy-to-harvest new raspberry, Cascade Premier

Republished from WSU News

Raspberries growing on canes.
Early fruiting with good yield and flavor, firm fruit, good root rot tolerance, and machine harvestable, WSU’s newest raspberry cultivar is named Cascade Premier.

Bright, flavorful, and bred for easy automated harvest, Washington State University’s new red raspberry variety, “Cascade Premier,” is more than a decade in the making.

First crossed in 2007 from two WSU experimental varieties, and released to growers in 2018, the new variety has continually shown promise in its bounty, disease resistance and growing qualities.

Now in its debut year, Cascade Premier’s first full harvest is expected in summer 2021.

Of the 10 raspberry varieties that Puyallup-based small fruit breeder Patrick Moore has released in his 31 years at WSU, “this is one of the best,” he said.

“It’s unusual to get something that’s this flavorful, firm, colorful, easy releasing, and resistant to disease,” Moore added. “This one hits all the sweet spots.” » More …

Dr. John Stark among WSU faculty elected to Washington State Academy of Sciences

Eight faculty from Washington State University have been elected to membership in the Washington State Academy of Sciences, an organization that advances science in the state and informs public policy.

The new members come from WSU campuses across the state and represent a range of scientific specialties. They’ll be officially inducted in September, in a ceremony at Seattle’s Museum of Flight. » More …

WSU scientist’s species discovery helps save colorful peony from ugly disease

Student researcher Andrea Garfinkel chats with a farm worker in a Netherlands peony field.Student researcher Andrea Garfinkel, right, chats with a farm worker in a Netherlands peony field during a 2015 visit. For the past three years, Garfinkel has researched diseases of peonies, discovering multiple new species of the Botrytis pathogen.
A symbol of good fortune and happy marriage, the peony has been a beloved centerpiece of floral arrangements and wedding bouquets for hundreds of years.

Pacific Northwest farmers have found success growing these bountiful blooms for a thriving global market. But they’re held back by a devastating … » More …

Markus Flury wins soil physics medal

Dr. Markus Flury taking a soil sample.
Soil scientist Markus Flury takes soil samples at the Hanford nuclear reservation, studying movement of radioactive compounds.

For more than 20 years, Markus Flury has studied how the soil and water under our feet interact, influencing the food we eat and the water we drink.

Now, the Washington State University soil scientist’s achievements have earned him a prestigious accolade from the Soil Science Society of America: The Don and Betty Kirkham Soil Physics Award. » More …

The Innovators lecture series features Puyallup researcher

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Congratulations to Dr. Jenifer McIntyre on being invited to present as part of WSU’s The Innovators lecture series.

The Innovators lecture series spotlights WSU research achievements. Faculty experts and industry leaders fuel informed discussion about important issues that impact our quality of life. They share discoveries that could spark positive change in Washington and beyond. » More …